Feminism in the kitchen

Image courtesy of www.mediabistro.com

Image courtesy of http://www.mediabistro.com

This article by Michael Pollan is what really got me thinking and led to this blog.  The article, in New York Magazine is entitled “Out of the Kitchen, Onto the Couch” and is full of disturbing factoids about the kitchen habits (or lack thereof) of the average American since the success of feminism.   The article got all sorts of press, mainly outrage from the feminist ranks, but I for one think the man’s got a point.

It absolutely does not need to be the woman, but someone should ‘slave’ away in the kitchen for at least 30 minutes to an hour to prepare dinner each night.  Imagine the things that would improve, families who eat dinner together are going to stay together longer, know more about their kids, be thinner (no more McDonalds), and just happier on the whole (disclaimer: these are musings, not facts.  They are also, however, common sense).   Pollan suggests that despite protestations of having no time to cook, the average person actually spends more time watching others cook on television than doing it themselves:

“Today the average American spends a mere 27 minutes a day on food   preparation (another four minutes cleaning up); that’s less than half the time that we spent cooking and cleaning up when Julia arrived on our television screens. It’s also less than half the time it takes to watch a single episode of “Top Chef” or “Chopped” or “The Next Food Network Star.” What this suggests is that a great many Americans are spending considerably more time watching images of cooking on television than they are cooking themselves — an increasingly archaic activity they will tell you they no longer have the time for.”

Perhaps this problem could be solved if feminism and never-cooking were extricated. If a woman gets home early and has an extra hour, she should make dinner. If a woman enjoys cooking, likewise. Although women and men should be equal, we need not be the exact same and I for one, will be thrilled to cook the roast while my beau mows the lawn.

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2 Comments

Filed under Musings

2 responses to “Feminism in the kitchen

  1. Julie

    Hi! Just came across your blog. I agree with your ideas on this. I think the part of feminism that has decided we must shun everything traditionally thought of as “feminine” and instead take on traditionally “masculine” roles in order to stake out an equal claim in society is wholly misguided. If we have to behave in “masculine” ways to be recognized as valuable members of society, isn’t that just the same problem, different manifestation?

    For women who happen to fall into “masculine” traits more easily naturally, of course, this criticism does not apply. I’m just tired of hearing my fellow feminists denigrate things I value: being domestic, baking, raising children, caring for a home, even being submissive to a husband if that’s my belief. A key role of feminism for me is having a VALUABLE and RESPECTED voice with the personality, traits, and “gendered characteristics” you naturally have. Not having to fit society’s mold of valuable to be recognized, and DEFINITELY not settling for NOT being recognized.

    Phew, long rant! Anyhow, I’m with ya. Let’s go cook 🙂

    • domesticfeminist

      Hi Julie, I’m glad you found me! You’ve managed to expressed in such an articulate way the very things I believe – it’s not that I don’t think women can be more ‘masculine’ or be whomever they wish to be; it’s that I want to be more domestic and reserve the right to make that choice and still call myself a feminist. Anyhow, thanks for posting!

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